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Baby food stains out clothes

How to Get Baby Food Stains Out of Clothes

Image by Kim Love

It’s one of life’s little conundrums: how to remove baby food stains from clothes effectively without ruining the fabric or using a detergent that may be harmful to your little one’s skin? Baby food stains can be tricky to remove at the best of times – especially when they are brightly coloured like carrot puree or tomato sauce. But what if you want to keep your energy bills down and use a gentle detergent too? With Persil products it’s possible to tick all of these boxes.

Check out our advice on baby laundry and choosing a baby laundry detergent in our guide. For tough stains, like carrot puree and pea puree, we recommend Persil small & mighty Bio as it works brilliantly on these stains, even in a cooler wash.

How to Get Baby Food Stains Out

Before you attempt to remove baby food stains you should:

  1. Check the care labels of the clothes. Find out the maximum water temperature you can use to avoid stretching the garments and to avoid colour bleed.
  2. Scrape any baby food off the garment carefully. This may be difficult to do without spreading the stain, but you should try to remove any excess food and avoid pushing the stain further into the fabric, as this will make it harder to get out.
  3. Treat the stain as soon as possible. Although it’s a bit of a chore to have to change your child’s clothes as soon as they get food on them, it’s better than allowing a stain to dry. If this happens the stain will set and will be much harder to remove.

Removing baby food stains can be as easy as child’s play if you use the following steps:

  • Soak the stain in cold water. If you have the time, you should let the garment soak overnight. It can be handy to keep a lidded soaking bucket near your washing machine (though out of the reach of your little one) so you can put items like cloth bibs or nappies directly in to soak. Avoid using hot water as this may set the stain and may cause fabrics to shrink.
  • Pre-treat the stain. Before you put the garment into the wash, you might want to apply a pre-treatment to tackle especially tough stains. Persil small & mighty Bio, or Persil small & mighty Non Bio can be used in this way: the handy Stain Eraser Ball makes the liquid easy to apply, saving you time and extra effort mixing your own homemade stain removers! Be sure to follow the instructions on the label.
  • Wash as normal. Put the stained garment into the wash with other clothes of the same colour and fabric type and wash on a cycle recommended by the care label. If the stain remains, repeat these steps a second time. Only hang the garment out to dry, once the stain has been fully removed.
  • Bonus Tip. Wash your baby’s clothes with some Comfort Pure Fabric Conditioner, as well as Persil small & mighty, to make sure they’re super soft for delicate baby skin! Read our article on how to use fabric conditioner for tips.

Remember: always keep washing detergents on a high shelf or locked away from little fingers and follow the instructions on the label of your product for the recommended dosage. How do you get baby food stains out of clothes?

Pee, poop, spit up. When it comes to baby clothing, they’re the trifecta. Little daubs and dribbles come with the territory when you have kids, and life’s too short to stress over a few smudges. But if you love the look of a spotless baby bib, a pristine romper or a snowy white blanket, you need a few stain-lifting tricks up your sleeve.

Pretreating lifts most stains. Our bibs are reversible. You can always flip the bib until you’re ready to do laundry.

Finding what works to take out baby clothing stains takes trial and error. So we’re offering a few techniques you can try.

One word of caution: Be careful with items that are delicate or treasured. Test a cleaning method on an inconspicuous spot to be sure the item won’t discolor. Some of our baby accessories are made to be hand washed and line dried. Always check care instructions before washing.

3 Ways to Remove Stains From Baby Clothes

Stain removal involves pretreating. It’s easier remove a stain when it’s fresh.

Oxygen Bleach Method

Oxygen bleach typically includes sodium percarbonate (baking soda) and sodium carbonate (washing soda). This color safe bleach is used for all fabrics and does not contain any chlorine. OxiClean is an example of an oxygen bleach.

You can use this method on any stain including those caused by spit up, food and poo. If the big kids or adults in your family have sweat-stained clothes, it may work on those spots, too.

Tip: Before washing, mark the stain with a safety pin or by basting around it with contrasting thread. It’s hard to see spots once the fabric is wet. Why does that matter? You don’t want to put a garment in the dryer until you get the stain out, and it sometimes takes more than one try to get the item clean.

Here’s how to use powdered oxygen bleach as an all-purpose stain remover:

  1. Rinse the item in cool water.
  2. Make a paste with the powder and water.
  3. Apply it to the stain. Rub it in if you like.
  4. Let it set for 10 minutes. Wash as usual.
  5. If the stain is gone, throw the garment in the dryer.

If the stain remains, try this:

  1. Apply the paste and let it sit again.
  2. Add a scoop of oxygen bleach to a bucket of hot water.
  3. Soak the item overnight
  4. Wash as usual.

Enzyme Detergent Method

Many detergents contain enzymes, a type of protein. Enzyme detergents work well on stains caused by organic substances such as:

  • Greasy foods, milk, eggs, chocolate
  • Vomit, urine, feces, sweat, blood
  • Mud, grass

Laundry detergents contain a variety of enzymes. Here’s what to look for on the ingredients list:

  • Amylase or protease – works on starches and proteins, including food, milk, and blood.
  • Lipase – works best for oily stains
  • Cellulase – keeps cottons from turning gray

Here’s how to treat stains with an enzyme detergent:

  1. Rinse with cool water.
  2. Apply an all-purpose detergent that contains enzymes to the stain.
  3. Let the item sit, then wash in warm water with an enzyme detergent and oxygen bleach.

Rubbing Alcohol, Vinegar Method

When diluted, rubbing alcohol is safe for most fabrics. Here’s how to treat a stubborn stain:

  1. Rinse in cool water.
  2. Soak for about 15 minutes in one part water and one part rubbing alcohol.
  3. If the stain is gone, wash as usual.
  4. If the stain remains, soak again in one part water and one part vinegar.
  5. Wash.

These methods work well most of the time. The oxygen bleach method can even take care of old yellow stains making hand-me-downs look like new.

Check out our collection of reversible bibs and cute collars. You can turn them over until it’s time to do the laundry!

Baby food stains – you spend a fortune on a gorgeous little outfit for your baby… but one messy meal-time later – it’s ruined!

Just how DO you keep baby’s clothes clean?

Well, one of the most most useful things we’ve learned in raising our five messy little munchkins is that the sterilizing solution used for baby’s bottles is also great for removing baby food stains!

Simply mix the solution as per the instructions on the bottle, in the same way that you would if it were to be used for sterilizing bottles! The solution has a mild “bleaching” effect – safer for your clothes than regular house bleach, which can lead to your clothes literally falling apart!

Here are some more ideas to help keep baby’s clothes clean…

  • The easiest way, if the weather allows, is to feed your baby naked!
  • Invest in a few “coverall” type bibs that have long sleeves and tie at the back.
  • If clothes are stained, remove them and soak them IMMEDIATELY in cold water. Dried out stains are much harder to shift.
  • Rub liquid soap (not bar soap) into the fresh stain. Leave for 30 mins, then launder as usual.
  • Combine hydrogen peroxide 50/50 with water, apply it to the stain and leave for 30 mins. Rinse with a 50/50 mixture of water and vinegar, then launder as usual.
  • Take advantage of the mild bleaching effect of the sun. We’re lucky enough to live in a place where we get strong sunshine most of the time. If we hang our laundry with any stains facing the sun, they either lighten up or disappear altogether.
  • If you don’t succeed in removing a stain the first time around, try again before the clothing is dry. In particular, don’t tumble dry the item – the stain will then become practically impossible to remove.

If all else fails, keep in mind that ‘stained’ doesn’t necessarily mean ‘dirty’. We’ve always kept a few bibs aside for those really messy meals, like carrots and blueberries. They get used, then we wash them – and we’ve learned to accept that they ARE clean, in spite of the fact that they’re still bright orange or purple!

Are you stressed by the mess?

See our tips for coping with a messy eater

How do YOU get baby food stains out of clothes?

If you’ve discovered an effective method, then please do share with other parents by leaving your comments below!


Use these removal techniques for mixed-ingredient baby foods, such as “assorted vegetables” or “mixed cereal with apples and bananas.”

For single-ingredient baby foods, such as “carrots” or “applesauce,” consult the appropriate stain-removal entry.

Fabric

1. Presoak in cold water and liquid laundry detergent.

2. Launder in warm water.

3. If the stains remain, pretreat with a prewash stain remover or rub liquid laundry detergent into the stain.

4. Launder again.

Upholstery

1. Using a clean white cloth, sponge the stain with a dry-cleaning solvent.

2. Blot until the solvent is absorbed.

3. Repeat Steps 1 and 2 until the stain disappears.

OR

1. Mix one tablespoon of liquid hand dishwashing detergent with two cups of cool water.

2. Using a clean white cloth, sponge the stain with the detergent solution.

3. Blot until the liquid is absorbed.

4. Repeat Steps 2 and 3 until the stain disappears.

5. Sponge with cold water and blot dry.

Carpet

1. Using a clean white cloth, sponge the stain with a dry-cleaning solvent.

2. Blot until the solvent is absorbed.

3. Repeat Steps 1 and 2 until the stain disappears.

4. Sponge with cold water and blot dry.

OR

1. Mix one tablespoon of liquid hand dishwashing detergent with two cups of warm water.

2. Using a clean white cloth, sponge the stain with the detergent solution.

3. Blot until the liquid is absorbed.

4. Repeat Steps 2 and 3 until the stain disappears.

5. Sponge with cold water and blot dry.

For more on stain removal, see Good Housekeeping’s Stain Rescue

Removing Food Stains from Baby’s Clothing

  • How to get stains out from baby food like sweet potatoes
  • Also see: Laundering baby clothes

How to get stains out from baby food like sweet potatoes

Dec 2001

My five month old daughter has just started babyfood and of course with that comes a new problem with her laundry — stain fighting! Does anyone have a good recommendation on what products to use on her clothing? How do i get out those sweet potato stains??!! I am still using dreft detergent. thanks, elizabeth

I think Zout is the best thing in my laundry room. I can get out even old set in stains in all colors. You can buy at the grocary store. Dana

use a spot stain remover like Shout or Zout. Both have worked for almost everything. I also have never used Dreft – I use Arm & Hammer and just recently bought All liquid since it doesn’t have enzymes in it. Good luck – you might also put the babe in white as it can be bleached and save the nice stuff for after meals. Freyja

My mother in law told me about Casscade- the dishwasher detergent. It works GREAT, just buy the powder, make a paste with it, scrub it on, then wash it as normal. Works wonders… Also, I used to use Dreft, and found that it didn’t work as well as other laundry soap. My pediatrician said that using a dye and perfume free soap would be just as good for the baby. Rachel

use plain old liquid Tide, unscented, on my laundry including the baby’s clothes that are stained with sweet potato, green beans, etc. I don’t pre-treat, and all the stains just come out in the wash. I think I remember reading that Tide and other laundry detergents have some special stain-removing quality built in. Ginger

I have had good luck pretreating stains with ‘Spray and Wash’ or ‘Shout’ as the clothes go into the hamper, then washing as usual. You can pretreat clothes up to seven days with either of these. ellen

Nature’s Miracle really works well on this. It’s marketed as a pet odor/stain remover. You can buy it in pet food stores. (Get the liquid form.) It contains an enzyme that breaks down proteins. I recently used it on week-old pomegranate juice stains–totally gone! — Kellie

Zout works wonders (better than Shout in my experience). Use it BEFORE you wash the stained clothes though. Rub it in well, let it sit about 10 minutes, then wash in regular manner. For a really bad stain, I have soaked clothes in a pail of water after rubbing in Zout, and this worked well.

I found that the key to getting out baby food stains is to start to work on it before it dries. Put some soap on it, rub the stain to get the solids out and the soap into the cloth, and put it in a tub (with cold water) to soak until you do the laundry (in cold water). I found that once a stain is dry it is much more difficult to remove.

Other measures to deal with stains include dressing your child in clothes with dark colors or patterns, and not worrying about stains. Remember, a baby’s clothes can be clean, even if they are stained. Suzanne

Getting food stains out of baby’s clothing: I highly recommend a product called Zout. It works wonders on all stains. Also, you probably do not need to spend the money on Dreft. Since my baby was a newborn I have been using Arm & Hammer Detergent that is free of any perfumes etc. It is a powder in the large box and much more cost effective! Hope this helps. Melinda

I keep a plastic tub of water with a little Tide in it (Tide Free, available at Target most of the time) near the washer. All messy clothes go straight into this prewash tub as soon as possible. Sometimes they sit there for three days before washing. I don’t do any scrubbing on spots at all, except for a few times when stains got set in. The only stain I have to treat differently is banana. Once the black splotches appear the only thing I have found that works is Oxiclean (available at Bed, Bath, and Beyond) rubbed directly into the spot. I don’t think that is a recommended use method, but it has saved a couple of tops that I would have had to toss otherwise. Good luck! Kimberly

Here’s the URL of a huge web site on stain removal, hope it’s of use. . However, I think you might want to give up on the idea of stain-free clothes. We tried a lot of stuff, but some of those stubborn, under the chin stains just won’t come out! Good luck, -michael s.

A different remedy for stains on clothing: For kid’s clothing stains of all kinds I’ve used Burt’s Bees Gardener’s Hand Soap (they have a web site) to scrub the stain before regular washing. It has worked on almost everything, but like other remedies, it matters how long the stain has been on the clothing. Even after a day or two, however, it works well enough to fade out the stain so it is not obvious on the clothing. I still use shout, zout, biz and/or bleach pretreatment for situations where they will work or it is a large area of dirt, but scrubbing with the hand soap has always worked better for me for such things as colorful food or paint splotches. Susan

I try to rinse out her clothes when I take them off her at the end of the day. Then I spray a little Shout on the stained area. So far, everything – absolutely everything – has come out with this method. I really swear by Shout! Sarah

I never really learned how to do laundry until I had a baby, who is now 2. My mom always just threw everything in together (yes, my dad had pink underwear sometimes…). Note: I find no need to separate baby’s wash from the rest of the family’s, unless you have a newborn or a baby with skin issues, like allergies.

First separate colors from whites. Wash whites with about a cup of bleach; –I’ve found that most baby clothes that are white with pictures or patterns can be washed in bleach without the colors changing. Use HOT water to wash those, along with regular detergent, and add the bleach after the tub is full of water.

For colors, spray stains with Shout or Spray N Wash (big containers to refill spray bottles are cheap at Costco) as soon as possible after getting the stain, though, to be honest, I often don’t do it til I wash the clothes…and use a regular dose of detergent with that load too (wash in cold or warm).

The only thing I have been unable to get out in the last 2 years is mildew, which occurs when you put wet or damp clothes in the hamper, and an indelible stain sets. I tossed out a few articles of clothing before figuring out what it was–now I let clothes dry flat or hanging before tossing in the hamper, or wash them promptly.

One other note– if oil or other substances don’t come out with the above methods, rewash using more Shout and hotter water–eventually all will be clean. Good luck! –Heidi

I have quite a bit of experience in working with stained clothes because I happen to work at Clorox in downtown Oakland. First, a good reference is the Tide website. They have a PDA download for stains which is helpful. Second, realize that it depends on what kind of stain it is — different stain removers work well with different kind of stains. For example, something may work well with oily/greasy stains but not with berry juice. Generally, though, you can rely on 1) pretreating with a high-quality detergent like Tide 2) pretreating with a color safe bleach like Clorox 2 or Biz (the powders are much more effective than the liquids). 3) Use a pretreater like Shout or Spray n’ Wash 4) For whites, nothing beats the stain removal power of bleach. I would recommend a thicker bleach we make called Clorox Advantage. It’s thicker so it doesn’t splash, it whitens better, it doesn’t have a strong odor and it doesn’t leave a residue. In general, pretreating does alot. Get one of those pretreating applicators that Tide sells (the tide Kick — a resevoir with a roller ball applicator). Good luck! Bryant

Set-in baby food stains: A step-by-step guide

  • Begin by gently scraping as much excess food off your baby’s clothes as possible. You may find using a spoon works best for this, but be careful with the motions and actions you use. Scraping sidewards along the material isn’t recommended – not only can you encourage the stain to spread, but you may also pull the fibres of the garment, and we all know that keeping baby clothes soft and comfortable is hugely important. Instead, try to gently scrape in an upward motion, away from the clothing.
  • Soak the clothing in a bowl of cold water. You can do this for a few hours at least, but if you’ve discovered a stain in the evening, take advantage and leave the clothing to soak overnight. What this does is just soften the stain, and prevents it from drying out, which could make it much more difficult to remove. As the fabric absorbs water it tends to swell a little, opening the fibres up and encouraging the easy release of the food residues. Never soak in hot water as the heat could set the stain, making it a permanent fixture.
  • You can also pre-treat the stain with Persil small & mighty bio – the Stain Eraser Ball makes it easy to pre-treat stains. Just follow the directions on the label.
  • Pop the clothing into the washing machine with Persil small & mighty bio (make sure to read the directions on the label first, and to read the care label on the garment, too).
  • Optional: you may also wish to add some fabric conditioner to your wash. Fabric conditioner helps to keep clothes soft, so is ideal for protecting delicate baby skin from irritation. Choose a gentle fabric conditioner like Comfort Pure.

Handy Hint: Keep your Persil small & mighty bio in a locked cupboard or drawer close to your washing machine (where your kids can’t reach). As you’re putting your baby’s clothes into the wash, inspect them thoroughly for any signs of baby food stains – be sure to look at socks, sleeves, cuffs, and even inside the garments as they’ll get that stuff everywhere! If you notice a stain, you’ve got your pre-treatment product right there within arm’s reach. Remember – the quicker you tackle a stain the better.

A Step-by-Step Guide to Treating Baby Food Stains

  • Begin by gently scraping as much excess food off of your baby’s clothes as possible. You may find that using a spoon works best for this but be careful with the motions and actions that you use. Scraping side wards along the material isn’t recommended – not only can you encourage the stain to spread, but you may also pull the fibres of the garment, and we all know that keeping baby clothes soft and comfortable is hugely important. Instead, try to gently scrape in an upward motion, away from the clothing, almost as if you are scooping the food up.
  • Soak the clothing in a bowl of cold water. You can do this for a few hours at least, but if you’ve discovered a stain in the evening, take advantage and leave the clothing to soak overnight. This works to soften the stain, and prevents it from drying out, which could make it much more difficult to remove. As the fabric absorbs water, it tends to swell a little, opening the fibres up and encouraging the easy release of the food residues. Never soak the items in hot water as the heat could set the stain, making it a permanent fixture.
  • You can also pre-treat the stain – the Stain Eraser Ball makes it easy to pre-treat stains. Just follow the directions on the label.
  • Pop the clothing into the washing machine with OMO Auto Liquid (make sure to read the directions on the label first, and to read the care label on the garment, too).

Top Tip:

By Hannah Wren

It’s no secret that tiny humans can make a big mess at mealtimes. No person, pet or object seems to be out of reach for an animated infant at dinner. It’s both impressive and puzzling that someone so small can launch food so far.

Even with the appropriate precautions, it’s only a matter of time until one or more of your favorite fashion pieces falls victim to a sweet potato smear, or a berry-stained hand. Here are 6 easy ways to remove baby food stains from your favorite clothing items:

  1. The water and soap method

When a stain is fresh, run the item under cold water with a bit of detergent hand soap. Lightly dap the food off your little one’s clothes, rather than set the stain in or let it spread. Let the item dry, then wash in the machine as usual.

  1. The distilled white vinegar method

For stains that are already set in, pat the stain with distilled white vinegar until it’s fully damp. Then throw the item in the laundry. Don’t place it in the dryer if the stain persists. Instead, you might need to repeat the process. Vinegar can remove vomit, grass, and blood stains, too.

  1. The baking soda (or powdered detergent) and water method

For this method, you can use powdered detergent if you don’t have baking soda, though baking soda helps with smelly stains. Pour 4 tablespoons of baking soda (or powdered detergent) and ¼ cup of warm water in a bowl and stir together to make a paste. Rub the paste onto the affected area and let it sit before tossing it in the wash. But wait! This method only works for clothing that isn’t color fast (clothing that doesn’t transfer color in the wash). You can test for color fastness by rubbing the item onto a white washcloth and seeing if any color transfers.

  1. The seltzer water or club soda method

Sparkling water has been known to remove red wine stains from carpets and can work for food stains, too. Simply pat the bubbly onto the stain, let it dry, then launder. While this method doesn’t always work as well as those above, it’s still worth a try.

  1. The bleach method

Stains on white clothing are arguably the worst kind, but in these instances bleach is your best friend. Wash the item with a ½ cup of bleach and then air dry. Bleach companies like Clorox warn against using bleach with clothing that is made of spandex, wool, silk, mohair, or leather.

  1. The Tide to Go pen method

This pen is like magic, especially for parents on-the-go. All you have to do is shake the pen and press down on the stain until it’s damp.

Need help with toddler meals? Raised Real has you covered.

How To Remove Baby Food Stains

Baby food stains are bound to happen whenever your sweet baby starts eating solid foods.

Your sweet child will throw it, spit it, or otherwise get baby food into places heretofore unimaginable, including on fabric, upholstery and carpet.

As an example, I once found such a spot on one of my children’s socks. How random!

That means you’ve always got to check inside the cuffs of shirts and pants before washing them, because they too can hide some baby food splatters and stains.

But have no fear, you can get rid of these stains using the instructions below.

Please note, however, that not all baby food is made of exactly the same thing, with different fruits and vegetables, and sometimes meats and starches also included within it.

If the general instructions below don’t seem to be doing the trick I suggest looking at the A-Z Stain Removal Guide and following the instructions for the specific ingredients within the baby food that caused the spot or splatter.

Some of the most common types of baby food stains are caused by the following ingredients:

  • Apples
  • Banana
  • Blueberry
  • Carrots
  • Cottage cheese
  • Orange
  • Peaches
  • Pear
  • Peas (see picture below)
  • Squash
  • Sweet potato
  • Tomato
  • Yogurt

Removing Baby Food Stains From Fabric

Step 1: Scrape off any excess baby food from the fabric, being careful not to spread it around further.

Step 2: Run the fabric, inside out, under the cold water to flush out as much of the spot as possible.

Step 3: Apply liquid laundry detergent to the stained area and let it soak in cold water for 15-30 minutes.

Step 4: Rinse with cold water.

Step 5: Pretreat the stain with a laundry prewash stain remover.

Hint: You may like this stain removal tip about where to keep your favorite stain remover when dealing with baby stains!

Step 6: Launder in the hottest water the fabric will allow to get out the spot, and either chlorine bleach if the fabric will allow it, or color safe bleach if not.

Hint: Make sure the spot is gone after washing, but before you place in the dryer or you may set it. Repeat if necessary.

Stain Removal Caused By Baby Food From Upholstery

Step 1: Scrape off any excess baby food from the upholstery.

Step 2: Mix a solution of two cups cool water and one tablespoon dishwashing liquid.

Step 3: Using this solution, sponge the stain with a clean white cloth.

Step 4: Next, blot until the liquid is absorbed.

Step 5: Repeat steps 3-4 until the spots are removed from the upholstery.

Step 6: Now that the stain is removed you should get plain cold water and a new white cloth and sponge the area to remove the cleaning solution, and then blot dry.

Hint: Be sure to get the upholstery only as wet as necessary for removing the stain.

In the alternative, instead of using the dishwashing solution, you can use dry cleaning solvent.

You can get more information on how to clean upholstery here.

How To Remove Stains From Baby Food From Carpet

The instructions for removal of stains caused by baby food from carpet is the same as for upholstery.

Recommended Baby Food Stain Removers

Perhaps you don’t want to make your own stain remover, but instead want to use something designed to remove baby food stains.

Here are some articles and reviews on this site which discuss various products that are designed to remove these stains, or where readers have said they had luck cleaning up these stains with these products:

Baby Oxiclean Soaker Totally Toddler Stain Remover Carbona Stain Devil #8 For Wide Range Of Food Stains Biz & Oxiclean As Presoaker


Dry Cleaning Solvent HE Dreft Liquid Detergent Shout Advanced Ultra Gel With Scrubber Biz Powder


Zout Pretreater Spray Fels Naptha Soap Whink Wash Away + Oxiclean Soaker Regular Oxiclean Powder


Oxiclean Free Baby Laundry Products Information & Reviews

You can also share your own stain remover reviews here for other removers that work on baby food, or any other stain.

Do You Have Any Tips To Share For Removing These Stains?

I’m always looking for more tips and ideas for how to remove stains. You can share your stain removal tip here, or read 100’s of others already submitted by other readers.

Get Even More Stain And Spot Removal Help Here

Are you a stain magnet like me? If so, check out the A to Z Stain Removal Guide which gives directions for how to remove over 100 types of stains from all kinds of surfaces.

Second photo by mgessford and third photo by jencu

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Related Pages You May Enjoy

A-Z Guide: Instructions For Removing Over 100 Types Of Stains

Removing Baby Oil Stains

Go From Removing Baby Food Stains To Home Page

CAUTION: This website is provided for informational purposes only. It is provided as is, without warranties or guarantees. Some stains and messes just won’t come out, and are permanent. Further, some cleaning methods can harm your item, so if what you want to clean or launder is sentimental or expensive call a professional. See disclaimer of liability for more information.

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