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How long past the expiration date is it safe to drink ensure?

Apple juice is delicious and refreshing, but sometimes you might find yourself buying far too much. That gallon jug seemed like such a good deal at the store, but you can only drink so much juice at one time. As you stare at the remaining 80% of the bottle, you may find yourself wondering, “can apple juice go bad?”

Can Apple Juice Go Bad?

Like other fresh juices, if left too long, apple juice can go bad. The shelf life of the juice depends on the type of apple juice, as well as storage conditions. Fresh juice that has not been pasteurized can be stored for up to seven days in the refrigerator past the printed expiration date, whether or not it has been opened. You should always check fresh juice for signs of spoilage before consuming.

Juice that has been pasteurized will have a longer shelf life. Apple juice that is boxed or kept in a sealed bottle may be stored in a cool, dark place for around two to three months past the printed expiration date. Canned apple juice, or fruit juice concentrate will last for up to nine months, if unopened and stored in a cool, dark place like your pantry or the refrigerator.

Once opened, pasteurized juices should be stored in the refrigerator, and should be consumed within ten days.

Image used under Creative Commons from Mike Mozart

Signs of Spoilage

Typically, when apple juice spoils, it has begun to ferment a bit. A good way to check for fermentation, is simply smelling the apple juice. If the odor is in any way sour, or is like beer or wine, than the juice has started fermenting and should be discarded. Small bubbles in the apple juice, or a slightly cloudy appearance are also indicators that the apple juice is fermenting and should not be consumed.

A change of color over time can also indicate that the apple juice is starting to ferment. If the juice becomes darker, you should definitely check for other signs of spoilage. Another visual indicator that apple juice has gone bad is mold growth. If there is any mold growing in the juice, it should not be consumed.

If the bottle becomes swollen or puffy, this is a clear sign that the juice has spoiled, and should be immediately discarded. Similarly, if the lid makes a popping noise when opened, as if gas is being released, the juice should not be consumed.

Freezing Apple Juice

Because of the high sugar content, apple juice will actually freeze quite effectively. If you’re trying to extend the shelf life of apple juice that is in your refrigerator, you may want to freeze the juice into popsicle molds, for a quick treat. You could also freeze the juice in ice cube trays, later transferring the frozen cubes to an airtight container, for use in smoothies or to chill a drink without watering it down.

If you’d like to freeze juice in a large container for later consumption, be careful not to freeze the juice in the original container. The juice will expand a bit while freezing, and may explode if there isn’t sufficient space. Be sure to open the juice and drink at least a glass before freezing. To thaw the juice, pull out the frozen bottle and let sit overnight in your refrigerator. Frozen juice can be stored up to a year in the freezer, but should be consumed within a week once thawed.

Another way to re-use apple juice that’s in danger of going bad is to turn it into a syrup. Simply simmer the apple juice on the stove (with cinnamon, if you desire) until the juice has reduced by 75% and is a thick syrup. Use this delicious syrup to top ice cream or pancakes. Store in an airtight container in your refrigerator for up to three months.

Food Storage – How long can you keep…

Tips

  • How long does apple juice last once opened? The precise answer depends to a large extent on storage conditions — keep opened apple juice refrigerated and tightly closed.
  • How long does opened apple juice last in the refrigerator? Apple juice that has been continuously refrigerated will keep for about 7 to 10 days after opening.
  • To further extend the shelf life of opened apple juice, freeze it: to freeze apple juice, store in airtight container and leave at least 1/2 inch headspace at the top, as juice will expand when frozen.
  • How long does apple juice last in the freezer? Properly stored, it will maintain best quality for about 8 to 12 months, but will remain safe beyond that time.
  • The freezer time shown is for best quality only — apple juice that has been kept constantly frozen at 0° F will keep safe indefinitely.
  • How long does apple juice last after being frozen and thawed? Apple juice that has been defrosted in the fridge can be kept for an additional 3 to 5 days in the refrigerator before using; apple juice that was thawed in the microwave or in cold water should be used immediately.
  • How can you tell if apple juice is bad? If apple juice develops an off odor, flavor or appearance, or if mold appears, it should be discarded.
  • Discard all apple juice from cans or bottles that are leaking, rusting, bulging or severely dented.

Sources: For details about data sources used for food storage information, please

How long after purchase does apple juice remain safe and tasty to drink?

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  • How long does unopened non-alcoholic Bloody Mary mix last? The precise answer to the question depends to a large extent on storage conditions – store unopened bottles of Bloody Mary mix in a cool, dark area.
  • To extend the shelf life of unopened Bloody Mary mix, keep unopened Bloody Mary mix away from direct sources of heat or light.
  • How long does unopened Bloody Mary mix last at room temperature? Properly stored, unopened Bloody Mary mix will generally stay at best quality for about 12 to 18 months when stored at room temperature, although it will usually remain safe to drink after that.
  • Is unopened Bloody Mary mix safe to drink after the “expiration” date on the bottle? Yes, provided it is properly stored, the bottle is undamaged and there is no sign of spoilage (see below) – commercially packaged Bloody Mary mix will typically carry a ” Best By,” “Best if Used By,” “Best Before”, or “Best When Used By” date but this is not a safety date, it is the manufacturer’s estimate of how long the unopened Bloody Mary mix will remain at peak quality.
  • How to tell if Bloody Mary mix is bad or spoiled? If Bloody Mary mix develops an off odor, flavor or appearance, it should be discarded.

Sources: For details about data sources used for food storage information, please

Does Bloody Mary Mix Expire?

How long does Bloody Mary Mix last before it will expire? We get asked this question all the time, so we thought we would answer in it’s own post.

The short answer is YES.

Unless your bloody mary mix is made of some material from an alien planet, every food product eventually expires. But let’s break this down into some answers that are a little more helpful.

Bloody Mary mix can last a few days to a few months. It all depends on what the ingredients are.

Does unopened bloody mary mix expire?

No, well not for several years. If you have any unopened Stu’s Bloody Mary mix, you can rest assured that it is not expired.

How long does opened bloody mary mix last?

Answer these quick questions to find out.

Does your Bloody Mary Mix contain tomato juice?

If Yes, keep refrigerated but then throw out your mix after 7 to 10 days.

Is Your Bloody Mary Mix STUs Bloody Mary Mix?

If Yes, then your bloody mary mix will last six months in the refrigerator.

Why does STUs Last 6 Months?

Here’s the good news, because we don’t have tomato juice in our concentrate…If you have an opened bottle of Stu’s, it will last 6 months.

This is much longer than some other bloody mary mixes that have tomato juice added.

If your bloody mary mix has the tomato juice already in it, I wouldn’t keep it in my fridge more than a week.

Once opened, tomato juice will generally last for about five to seven days. Keep in mind this is only if it’s kept in a refrigerator that is set to 40 degrees Fahrenheit or below. Don’t leave your juice out of the refrigerator for more than

If you have left your tomato juice out of the refrigerator for more than two hours, I’d toss it because temperatures higher than 40 F can lead to food spoilage.

Bloody Mary Garnishes and the food you’re pairing with your bloody marys will all vary on their expiration as well, so check each.

If for some crazy reason you find yourself in a pickle and have some Stu’s that has been opened longer than 6 months, just reorder your bloody mary mix here. Easy!

Hope that clears up any questions about how long bloody mary mix will last before it expires. For any other questions just leave a comment below.

Cinco de Mayo has long passed, but you’ve still got the remainder of that bottle of margarita mix, plus the unopened one in the pantry. Now you’re wondering if the mix is still good and if it will last until the next Cinco de Mayo party. Does margarita mix go bad?

If you’re one of the people who rarely if ever drink tequila and only in cocktails such as margarita, that’s a legitimate question to ask. Throwing out a perfectly good mix would be a waste. Storing one that should be discarded long ago is no good either.

Therefore, I think learning a bit about storage, shelf life, and if margarita mix can go bad makes sense. If that’s what you’re looking for, you’re in the right place.

Image used under Creative Commons from Ted Major

How To Store Margarita Mix

Let’s start with non-alcoholic margarita mixes, such as the popular Big Bucket margarita mix.

Before opening, you should store such a mix in a cool and dark place. A pantry is a great place, but a cabinet in the kitchen will do too. Just make sure it’s not in a place where the temperature fluctuates.

Once you open the bottle, or in case of Big Bucket the bucket, you should store it in the fridge for the best quality. If, after opening, you leave the mix in the pantry, it won’t go bad, but it’ll lose its freshness much faster than if you keep it chilled.

When it comes to ready-to-drink margarita mixes with tequila, such as the one sold by Jose Cuervo, storage guidelines are pretty similar. Before you open the bottle, store it in the pantry or kitchen cabinet. After you open the bottle, it’s probably best to keep it refrigerated.

Tip

Since mixes that already include tequila have a good amount of alcohol, they probably fare better at room temperature than non-alcoholic mixes, so storing in the pantry for a limited period is an option.

(credit: Luke Bender)

No matter if it’s a non-alcoholic mix or a ready-to-serve one, always make sure it is sealed tightly when not in use.

If the cap is damaged, broken, or simply lost (Cinco de Mayo parties..), pour the mix into another bottle that you can seal. Alternatively, if you don’t have access to a spare bottle at the moment, you need to channel your inner MacGyver and find a temporary solution. One possibility is to cover the bottle’s opening with plastic wrap and secure it with a rubber band.

Let’s finish this section with a few words about freezing margarita-mix. Generally speaking, freezing store-bought margarita mix rarely makes sense because its shelf life is quite long. Fresh homemade margarita mixes, on the other hand, are frozen quite often and with great results.

(credit: Tai’s Captures)

How Long Does Margarita Mix Last

Margarita mixes, both alcoholic and non-alcoholic ones, have a quite long shelf life and usually don’t go bad in the traditional sense of this word.

Each bottle comes with a best-by or use-by date, but those dates only inform for how long the product should be of best quality. That doesn’t mean the mix will spoil or become undrinkable a week or month after.

That means that with time the flavor of the mix will degrade slowly. And as long as the seal remains intact, the degradation process goes on very slowly. An unopened margarita mix can easily last for a year or even two past the date on the label. That means that the leftover unopened bottle can easily be used in next year’s Cinco de Mayo celebration.

Once you open the bottle, the taste profile starts to degrade faster. Obviously, the sooner you use the mix after opening, the better quality you will get. But if you don’t drink tequila that often, leaving the mix in the fridge for a few months is fine. After those few months, you might notice a slight change of taste, but the liquid will be safe for consumption and still quite good.

What about storing that opened mix for a whole year for the next Cinco de Mayo? Well, it’s difficult to say how good it will be. My best piece of advice would be to taste it a few days before the celebration and decide if it’s good enough for the party. If it’s not, you still have some time to buy a new mix or make one yourself.

Pantry Fridge
Margarita mix (Unopened) Best By + 1 year
Margarita mix (Opened) 6 – 9 months

Please note the dates in the table are approximate and for the best quality only. Margarita mix often will last much longer in reasonably good condition.

(credit: Johann Trasch)

How To Tell If Margarita Mix Is Bad?

Margarita mix, unless you leave the bottle uncapped, most likely won’t go bad in a way it will be unsafe to drink. But sometimes life finds its way and things don’t go according to plan.

Because of that, if you find that your mix smells odd (like extra sour), is discolored, or there are any particles in the bottle, discard it. Same thing if, for whatever reason, you’re not sure that it’s safe to drink.

We, humans, have pretty good intuition when it comes to spotting unsafe food, so you should use it. If it seems perfectly fine, give it a taste. If it tastes good, feel free to enjoy it.

What’s more likely to happen is that the margarita mix you have stored for quite some time will taste flat. It won’t smell fresh, and after a sip or two, you’ll notice that it doesn’t quite hit the spot.

If that’s the case, you can discard the mix for quality purposes. Another option is to try to revive it with some fresh lime or lemon juice. That might help, but I cannot guarantee you’ll be happy about the result.

Either way, there’s no point in mixing good tequila with flat-tasting margarita mix. If the mix tastes bad, cut your losses and throw it out.

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With electrolytes and quick burning carbohydrates, Gatorade and other sports drinks have become pretty standard hydration for workouts.

Of course, if you buy too much on sale, the question always arises: can Gatorade go bad? How long should you store those bottles of sports drink, or even the powdered mix?

(credit: Emma Dau)

Can Gatorade Go Bad?

Like many flavored beverages, Gatorade (and other sports drinks) can go bad. Unopened sports drinks can stay shelf stable for up to nine months past the written expiration date. Once the bottle has been opened, the shelf life reduces to about five days in the refrigerator.

The dry powder that can be mixed with water to make Gatorade can also go bad, after enough time passes. If the container is unopened, its shelf life is about two years past the written expiration date. Once opened, the product will begin to degrade in quality, and should be consumed within six months.

Like an open bottle of Gatorade, once the powder has been combined with water to make a drink, the beverage should be stored in a sealed container in the refrigerator, and should be consumed within five days.

Image used under Creative Commons from Mike Mozart

Signs That Gatorade Has Gone Bad

Bottles of gatorade that have been opened will begin to spoil after a few days, though visual signs might not be that obvious. Changes in color and texture are the main indicators. You may notice the drink begins to darken, form clumps, or form a crust near the opening of the bottle.

The taste and smell will also change, becoming less flavorful and a bit sour. Additionally, any sour or off-putting smell is an indication that the drink has gone bad and should not be consumed. Should you notice any mold growing in the bottle, the drink should not be consumed.

Once a container of powdered Gatorade has been opened, the quality will begin to decline fairly rapidly, depending on conditions. Though this degradation won’t necessarily lead to an unsafe product, the taste and texture can be significantly different. Gatorade can clump because of exposure to moisture. Some clumping is likely fine, but once the powder has formed a solid mass, the Gatorade should not be consumed.

Should you open the container of Gatorade powder to find any sign of insects, or mold (though it is highly unlikely that powdered Gatorade will grow mold), the drink mix should be discarded.

(credit: Ethan McArthur)

How to Store Gatorade

Bottled Gatorade, and other sports drinks, should be stored in a cool, dark place away from moisture or heat. The best place to store unopened bottles of gatorade is actually your pantry, or cellar.

Storing unopened bottles of Gatorade in the refrigerator will not dramatically increase their shelf life. Similarly, freezing bottled Gatorade will not really increase the shelf life, and the process of freezing could burst the bottle. Once the bottle has been opened, it should be kept in the refrigerator.

Powdered Gatorade that has not been opened can also be stored in a cool, dark place away from light, heat or moisture. Once the container has been opened, the moisture in the air will start to degrade the product. While the plastic container has a lid to keep out insects, the moisture in the air can still seep inside.

To extend the shelf life of powdered Gatorade, you could transfer the powder to an airtight container, like a glass jar. Oxygen absorbers or food grade desiccant packets will help to keep the drink powder from clumping up. Heavy duty zip top freezer bags with an oxygen absorber will also help to keep the powder fresh, and can come in handy on long camping trips!

If you just found a bottle of Gatorade sitting in the pantry for who knows how long, “does Gatorade go bad?” is the first question that came to your mind.

Gatorade, like any other energy drink, can go bad, but it happens very rarely.

In this article, we will go through what Gatorade producers tell us about storing, shelf life, and going bad of their sports drink. We will also discuss what people who drink Gatorade have to say about those topics.

If you’d like to read what Gatorade says about that, check out the FAQ on their website.

(credit: Monica’s Dad)

How To Store Gatorade

As long as the bottle of Gatorade is unopened, you can store it at room temperature. Once you open the bottle, the producer states that you should keep it in the fridge. That will, obviously, help this sports drink stay fresh for longer.

Many people don’t keep opened bottles of Gatorade in the refrigerator because they don’t like to drink it cold. If you’re among the people who prefer Gatorade at room temperature, try storing it in the fridge and taking out about 30 minutes before you need it. That solution should work well if you use Gatorade to power through your workouts. Unfortunately, it probably won’t if you’re drinking it to rehydrate throughout the day.

Either way, you need to worry about refrigerating Gatorade only if you plan on keeping it for longer than a day. If you use the whole bottle within a day, keeping it at room temperature probably won’t make any difference.

Last but not least, make sure you seal the bottle tightly when not in use. This way any bacteria or food particles won’t get into the liquid and (possibly) cause it to spoil.

(credit: Emma Dau)

How Long Does Gatorade Last

Gatorade comes with a best by date. That date informs you of how long, at the very least, the product should be at peak quality. Since Gatorade is shelf-stable, as long as it is unopened, you can store it even for a couple of years past the date on the package.

Of course, you should expect that the taste of Gatorade that’s 3 years past its date will be worse than that of a brand new bottle. But it should still be perfectly fine to drink.

Once you open the bottle, the producer recommends drinking its contents within a few days if you keep it chilled.

Truth be told, many people have stored for days and weeks, and the drink was okay. This is quite common for sports drinks. If you’ve opened a bottle of Gatorade 2 weeks ago, consumed half of it and put the rest into the fridge, it should be fine. It usually stays okay for longer than what the producer states, but remember that the quality will deteriorate over time.

When it comes to an opened bottle of Gatorade that chills in the fridge for a few days already, give it a quick exam before drinking.

Pantry Fridge
Gatorade (Unopened) Best By + 2 – 3 years
Gatorade (Opened) 1 – 3 days 7 – 10 days

Please note that the dates are approximate. When it comes to an opened bottle of Gatorade, always check it’s safe to drink before drinking a large amount.

(credit: John McArthur)

How To Tell If Gatorade Is Bad

Spotting Gatorade that is spoiled is no rocket science.

Before drinking, pour some into a glass and take a closer look and sniff it. If the color is off, there’s some sediment in the glass or bottle, or it smells funny, discard it.

Given that everything up to this point seems to be okay, drink a little. If it tastes okay, which is the most probable outcome, feel free to drink the rest. If the taste isn’t that great, you can discard it for quality purposes. Or decide to drink it anyway, if you don’t mind some self-inflicted torture.

One general piece of advice when it comes to spoilage is that the first signs of it are usually difficult to spot. Because of that, in certain situations, it’s better to assume the product is bad and discard it without even examining it.

For sports drinks, if you left the bottle unsealed for a few hours, it’s better to throw it out. It might be perfectly fine, but if it’s not, you won’t know about it.

  • How long do unopened sports drinks last? The precise answer to the question depends to a large extent on storage conditions – store unopened bottles of sports drinks in a cool, dark area.
  • To extend the shelf life of unopened sports drinks, keep unopened sports drinks away from direct sources of heat or light.
  • How long do unopened sports drinks last at room temperature? Properly stored, unopened sports drinks will generally stay at best quality for about 12-18 months when stored at room temperature, although they will usually remain safe to drink after that.
  • Are unopened sports drinks safe to drink after the “expiration” date on the bottle? Yes, provided they are properly stored and the bottle is undamaged – commercially packaged unopened sports drinks will typically carry a ” Best By,” “Best if Used By,” “Best Before”, or “Best When Used By” date but this is not a safety date, it is the manufacturer’s estimate of how long the unopened sports drinks will remain at peak quality.
  • Storage times shown are for best quality only – after that, the unopened sports drinks’ color or flavor may change, but in most cases, they will still be safe to consume if they have been stored properly and the bottle is not damaged.
  • How to tell if unopened sports drinks are bad? If unopened sports drinks develop an off odor, flavor or appearance, they should be discarded for quality purposes.

Sources: For details about data sources used for food storage information, please

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