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The pampered chef knife

Pampered Chef 12-Piece Knife Block Set Giveaway

This post may contain affiliate links. Please read my disclosure policy.

Happy Monday, friends! I hope that you all had a beautiful Easter weekend filled with lots of hope and goodness. And hopefully some carrot cake and a few Cadbury eggs. 😉

Instead of a recipe this Monday, I’m happy to announce that we have an extra-special giveaway launching on the site today for — you guessed it — a Pampered Chef Bamboo Knife Block Set!

Now, I definitely used to be the poster child for cooking good food with bad knives, having survived my twenties (including a few years blogging) with the $30 knife set I bought in college. Never let anyone tell you it can’t be done. But man oh man, cooking is sure a lot more fun and much more efficient with a set of really good, well-made knives on hand. Especially a gorgeous 12-piece set like this. Well worth the investment if you spend considerable time in the kitchen, in this food blogger’s sharp-knife-loving opinion.

So if you would love to add a set like this to your kitchen, read on for more details about this set and take a minute to enter the giveaway for a chance to win!

So what’s so great about this set?

Well, first of all I’m happy to say that I can vouch for it from personal experience. I have been a Pampered Chef fan for many years, with many of their products in my kitchen. (And I still buy my favorite Pampered Chef ice cream scoops as wedding presents to help friends easily fill cupcake and muffin liners, which earns me the raised eyebrow and then later a gushing thank-you once they realize how awesome those scoops are.) Anyway, the kind folks at PC heard about my hodgepodge of mostly bottom-of-the-line Walmart and TJMaxx knives and offered to send me a beautiful set to try out. And then — bonus — a second one to give away for one of you too!

And oh my goodness, I genuinely am in love.

I mean, I was super-stoked when I read all about Pampered Chef’s forged cutlery line. And things like the “fully forged, high-carbon German steel” that gives the knives the “perfect edge and sharpness, stain and corrosion resistance, and superior strength and durability”. And “full tang for strength and perfect balance”. And protective covers for each knife, especially handy for transporting them to my food styling gigs.

But any cook will tell you that the real test for knives happens once they’re in your hot little hands. And you get to put them to the test trying to cut open that pineapple, or slice a warm loaf of bread, or core some fresh tomatoes, or dice a pound of raw bacon. (Check, check, check and check.) Let me tell you — these knives not only sliced through those tests with flying colors, they actually made all of that cutting prep work feel like a party! Whoo — so fun!!!

Seriously, they fit in my hands perfectly. They felt like a nice weight. And goodness gracious, they are sharp and easy to use.

So you may be asking, what’s in the set? Well, lemme tell ya. The 12-piece Bamboo Knife Block Set includes a:

  • 9″ Bread Knife
  • 8″ Chef’s Knife
  • 7″ Santoku Knife
  • 5″ Santoku Knife
  • 5″ Utility Knife
  • 5″ Boning Knife
  • 4 1/2″ Serrated Knife
  • 3 1/2″ Paring Knife
  • 3″ Petite Paring Knives
  • Bamboo Knife Block
  • Forged Cutlery Honing Tool
  • Professional Shears

Feel free to click on any of the links to learn more about each individual piece. But basically, you have a rockin’ set of knives. (The 8-inch chef’s knife and 5-inch santoku are my new favs.) Plus a classy knife block. Plus a honing tool that is super-easy to use and works like a charm. Plus — arguably the most-used item in my kitchen — shears. Oh man, do you all use kitchen shears as often as I do? Muy importante.

But I have to say, one of my favorite things that comes with set is not pictured — a lifetime guarantee. Boom.

So all that said, if you happen to be in the market for new knives, I would totally recommend checking out this set. Or even looking into trying out one or two of the individual pieces if that fits better in your budget. You can also connect and learn more about Pampered Chef on their website, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

But either way, you should totally enter the giveaway to win a set too! Here’s how to enter:

Pampered Chef Bamboo Knife Block Set Giveaway

The Prize: 1 Pampered Chef Bamboo Knife Block Set

How To Enter: Follow the Rafflecopter instructions below. US Residents only, for this one.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Good luck!

Disclaimer: This giveaway is sponsored by Pampered Chef. As mentioned above, I was given a complementary knife set to review. But I was not paid for this giveaway, and all opinions are 100% my own as always. Thanks for supporting brands that I love who also help provide great giveaways like this!

posted on April 21, 2014 in Giveaways

The 12 Best Kitchen Knives You Can Buy in 2019

This definitive guide to the best kitchen knives of 2019 explores everything you need to know to buy your next favorite tool. It covers options at every price point, and it also clarifies which knives are essential and which ones you can cook without.

Quick Links
Best Chef’s Knives

  • Best Affordable Chef’s Knife: Victorinox Fibrox Pro Chef’s Knife
  • Best Western-Style Chef’s Knife: Zwilling J.A. Henckels International Pro 8-Inch Chef’s Knife
  • Best Japanese-Style Chef’s Knife: Global G-2
  • Best Value Chef’s Knife: Made In 8-Inch Chef’s Knife
  • Best Chef’s Knife to Give as a Gift: Korin Special Inox Gyutuo

Best Kitchen Knife Brands

Other Essential Knives

  • Best Bread Knife: Hoffritz Commercial Bread Knife
  • Best Paring Knife: Victorinox 3.25-Inch Spear Point Paring Knife
  • Best Serrated Utility Knife: Wüsthof Classic Serrated Utility Knife

Non-Essential Knives

  • Best Slicer/Carver Knife: Victorinox Fibrox 12-Inch Slicer
  • Best Cheese Knife: Swissmar Cheese Plane
  • Best Oyster Knife: OXO Good Grips Oyster Knife

There is no absolute best kitchen knife for every person. Different budgets, grip styles and aesthetic tastes, not to mention a dozen other micro-decisions, all determine which knife is best for the task at hand.

This guide aims to identify which kitchen knives are most useful, and hopefully, it helps you divorce from overpriced, unnecessarily bulky knife block sets. It also answers age-old questions haunting the kitchen: Do I really need a utility knife? When should I use paring knife? What in the hell does X50CrMoV15 mean? But first, our top recs for the most useful kitchen knives available in 2019.

The Short List

Best Kitchen Knife for the Money: Victorinox Fibrox Pro Chef’s Knife

The trick to buying a truly affordable chef’s knife is basically just finding a product with the least number of negatives.

In testing, we compared affordable options from Victorinox ($30), Wüsthof ($30), Hoffritz ($25) and Potluck, a direct-to-consumer brand that sell’s a chef’s knife as part of a set (it’s $60 for three knives). Frankly, all affordable chef’s knives handle onions, tomatoes and the breaking down of chickens pretty much the same — they are reasonably sharp out of the box but they will chip with consistent use.

Ultimately, Victorinox’s ultra cheap 8-inch chef’s knife won out, though it too is liable to blade chipping and isn’t the most comfortable to use. But for the price of two movie tickets, there isn’t a knife that performs this well or is as widely available (you can find them in most home goods sections). Also, the handle isn’t as aggressively “ergonomic” as many others in this category, making it a bit easier to switch between knife grips.

Best Japanese Kitchen Knife: Global G-2

Global’s kitchen knives are really weird. Here’s why that’s a good thing.

The design is both Japanese (the blade is very light and very thin) and anti-Japanese (its balance isn’t pushed toward the cutting end and the whole thing is one piece; most Japanese-style knives taper into a wooden handle). This means it has the nice slicing properties you’d expect from a great Japanese knife, but in a much more durable, familiar package. Its stainless steel makeup (exact properties are proprietary) resists staining or corrosion and remains wicked sharp during use.

In testing, we tried comparably-priced MAC knives ($93), Tojiro’s Good Design Award-winning knife ($68) and a few other more premium options, but none balanced the features of a typical Japanese knife with lower maintenance, reasonable prices, edge retention and smart design quite like Global’s G-2.

Best Premium Kitchen Knife: Korin Special Inox Gyutuo

It’s hard to put into words how great this knife is. It is impeccably balanced, gorgeous to look at and scores a high 60 on the Rockwell scale. It slices, chops and glides through anything gracefully and is somehow also fairly corrosion-resistant. It’s made of a slightly altered AUS-10 steel, which is technically a high carbon stainless mix (it carries properties of stainless and carbon steels). Its biggest fault is a penchant for staining, but staining only occurs when not properly cleaned and dried after use.

As nice as it is, though, we don’t recommend everyone runs out and spends $209 on a single knife (for what it’s worth, MAC’s more premium 8-inch chef’s knife is excellent and $60 more affordable than the Korin option). This is a knife you give as a gift to someone who you know will maintain it — maybe yourself.

Best Chef’s Knives

Victorinox Fibrox Pro Chef’s Knife

The trick to buying a truly affordable chef’s knife is basically just finding a product with the least number of negatives.

In testing, we compared affordable options from Victorinox ($30), Wüsthof ($30), Hoffritz ($25) and Potluck, a direct-to-consumer brand that sell’s a chef’s knife as part of a set (it’s $60 for three knives). Frankly, all affordable chef’s knives handle onions, tomatoes and the breaking down of chickens pretty much the same — they are reasonably sharp out of the box but they will chip with consistent use.

Ultimately, Victorinox’s ultra cheap 8-inch chef’s knife won out, though it too is liable to blade chipping and isn’t the most comfortable to use. But for the price of two movie tickets, there isn’t a knife that performs this well or is as widely available (you can find them in most home goods sections). Also, the handle isn’t as aggressively “ergonomic” as many others in this category, making it a bit easier to switch between knife grips.

Zwilling J.A. Henckels International Pro 8-Inch Chef’s Knife

A Western-style knife (sometimes called a German-style knife) is typically going to be heavier and have a thicker blade than a Japanese-style knife. Most Western-style knives sport more defined handle ergonomics as well (more details here). The category of Western-style chef’s knife is very, very large, but after testing two dozen of them, Zwilling’s 8-inch takes the cake. It is a stainless steel knife (the exact properties of the steel are proprietary) that’s stain- and corrosion-resistant. After months of testing, the blade didn’t chip or show signs of dulling in any way.

The largest differentiating factor between Zwilling’s 8-inch and Wüsthof’s highly-recommended forged 8-inch ($125) was the bolster. The Zwilling knife’s bolster fades into the blade less dramatically than the Wüsthof which, when using a pinch grip, was a lot more comfortable. That said, both got on sale fairly frequently and are solid buys.

Global G-2

Global’s kitchen knives are really weird. Here’s why that’s a good thing.

The design is both Japanese (the blade is very light and very thin) and anti-Japanese (its balance isn’t pushed toward the cutting end and the whole thing is one piece; most Japanese-style knives taper into a wooden handle). This means it has the nice slicing properties you’d expect from a great Japanese knife, but in a much more durable, familiar package. Its stainless steel makeup (exact properties are proprietary) resists staining or corrosion and remains wicked sharp during use.

In testing, we tried comparably-priced MAC knives ($93), Tojiro’s Good Design Award-winning knife ($68) and a few other more premium options, but none balanced the features of a typical Japanese knife with lower maintenance, reasonable prices, edge retention and smart design quite like Global’s G-2.

Made In Chef’s Knife

Direct-to-consumer brand Made In started with cookware, which remains its bread and butter, but the brand’s debut chef’s knife (released in 2018) is stellar. The blade is quite big and made with X50CrMoV15 steel (a mixture of carbon, chromium, molybdenum, vanadium, manganese and silicon), which is a staple for high-end Western blades. It is best described as a high-carbon stainless steel, meaning it carries some traits from carbon and stainless steel knives.

On top of this, Made In’s knife rocks a more straight-lined, Japanese-style handle and is finished in nitrogen. A better explanation is available courtesy of Knife Steel Nerds, but this essentially makes the blade far less susceptible to chipping. Finally, it easily worked through any and all cutting tasks we put it through.

We were also impressed with Material Kitchen’s knife ($75). Its blade is a bit smaller and it’s thinner and lighter than Made In’s, but it was a bit more prone to staining.

Korin Special Inox Yo-Deba

It’s hard to put into words how great this knife is. It is impeccably balanced, gorgeous to look at and scores a high 60 on the Rockwell scale. It slices, chops and glides through anything gracefully and is somehow also fairly corrosion-resistant. It’s made of a slightly altered AUS-10 steel, which is technically a high carbon stainless mix (it carries properties of stainless and carbon steels). Its biggest fault is a penchant for staining, but staining only occurs when not properly cleaned and dried after use.

As nice as it is, though, we don’t recommend everyone runs out and spends $209 on a single knife (for what it’s worth, MAC’s more premium 8-inch chef’s knife is excellent and $60 more affordable than the Korin option). This is a knife you give as a gift to someone who you know will maintain it — maybe yourself.

10 Knives World-Class Chefs Can’t Cook Without

All-purpose chef’s knives, single-focus slicing tools and everything in between. Read the Story

I find this funny because Pampered Chef’s knives are actually really nice. The enthusiastic PR person had sent me a few to try, and they easily surpassed the hodgepodge collection I had before. But I guess you can’t stay in the kitchenware party biz for a quarter-century by selling knives alone. Also, children. A big part of Caryn’s—and Pampered Chef’s—sales pitch is about cooking with kids. Knives and blades don’t really get along with tiny humans and their flailing limbs.

Caryn’s next dish is salad pizza, which turns out to be exactly what it sounds like. Salad pizza requires many more gadgets. There’s a slicer for peppers, another for cherry tomatoes, where you clamp the tomatoes in a plastic thing then slice through it sideways, another for onions. There’s a pair of scissors called “salad choppers” for lettuce.

Caryn tells us with loving exasperation that her husband decided to eat healthier, so she has to make him salads for lunch every day. Men! The unmarried people in the room laugh uncomfortably. Meanwhile, my mom adds items to her wishlist and snaps photos on her phone.

There’s a grill pan that cooks the pizza dough (store-bought) right on the stove. There’s a dressing container that has the dressing recipes right on the side of the container itself. “Who here is still friends with Pam?” Caryn asks. We realize she’s talking about the cooking spray. “It’s time to ditch her,” she says, revealing the familiar oil pump, rebranded in 2017 as a kitchen spritzer.

Watching Caryn cook is like watching a magician. She’s pushing buttons and moving levers, talking through every step until, BAM, there’s a meal, but I don’t quite trust it. The thought of needing an arsenal of tools to make a green salad feels a little… extra. Couldn’t I make the same meal in the same amount of time with a knife and a cutting board? I wonder if this is just part of Caryn’s show. She can’t possibly be using all this stuff at home. But then Caryn tells us she hated cooking before she started using Pampered Chef products. Having a tool for every task took the guesswork out of it for her. She says, when she’s in someone else’s kitchen, like her timeshare down South, she doesn’t know what to do without her toolkit of choppers, and this is confusing to me. It’s like Caryn came to teach us how to drive but is showing us how to juggle instead.

Over a dessert of pound cake (store-bought) with grilled pineapple (pineapple corer) and fresh whipped cream (30-second whipper), I fantasize about starting a company that comes to your house and teaches basic knife skills. Am I just an elitist jerk? I have no kids. The guy I live with loves to cook. When I’m in the kitchen, it’s because I want to be. But I also grew up watching my mom in the kitchen, 7 p.m. on weeknights, chopping her way through meals that were supposed to take 30 minutes but always seemed to take twice as long. That little manual food processor meant she could steal a look at my math homework without slicing off a finger—and it was dishwasher safe! Who am I to tell my mom that she should’ve just learned to chop faster? Who is anyone to tell anyone how they should cook?

This is something we’ve thought a lot about at Bon Appétit as we launched Basically. How do you help people become better cooks without talking down (or up) to them? How do you make cooking feel less intimidating and more enjoyable? Because we’re a food publication, our answer is to arm people with advice, recipes, techniques, and explainers. Because Pampered Chef is a kitchenware company, its answer is to arm people with products, and that, to me, is the fundamental divide.

By the end of the afternoon, Healthy in a Hurry has become three hours, three carb-based dishes, and a couple bottles of wine. No one’s complaining. Caryn and I are best friends, reminiscing about that time the groceries never came. Eventually, people start filtering out while my mom orders a can opener, a slicer-dicer, a new oil pump and… an actual knife! Other people must have secretly placed orders, because I get 100 bucks of my own to spend! I buy a sheet pan, some colanders, and a pizza stone like the one my mom has had for all those years. It arrives on our doorstep a week later, and we christen it with a totally satisfying sausage pizza. We keep the salad on the side.

Chrissie Abbott is an artist and designer in London. See more of her work here.

May 18, 2009 – 16:57 BST hellomagazine.com Product review: Pampered Chef Forged Santoku knife

Santoku are general purpose knives used traditionally in the Japanese kitchen. They differ from chef’s knives in style and are preferred by some, being generally shorter and wider than a chef’s knife.
The Pampered Chef Santoku feels like a weighty knife once out of the box, and a good knife should have some weight behind it for doing serious jobs like cutting dense squashes. However, in periods of long usage, this weight could count against it.
This is a fully-forged knife which means it is sharper and the cutting edge will last longer. It is much less likely to stain and it’s also easier to bring the edge back up to sharpness when it dulls. It is made from high-carbon steel which also adds to the blade’s durability.
The blade runs fully through the handle, the length of the entire knife which again adds durability and strength. The blade is tapered for precise cutting, although in the professional kitchen I found it too wide for some very fine jobs like finely slicing chives – the blade tended to mash rather than cut.
The knife has hollows along the length of the blade to prevent food sticking and to result in cleaner cutting, although the benefit of these was minimal – it was still a case of wiping the knife off every few chops while processing large amounts of ingredients.
It comes with a lifetime guarantee which is a distinct plus – buying a good quality blade will always work out cheaper in the end. A huge positive – one that the chefs who saw the knife couldn’t praise highly enough – was the black plastic blade cover. It protects the knife during transportation if you are going on a self-catering trip and also in kitchen drawers where so many knives end up scratched.
On the down-side, having ‘The Pampered Chef’ written down the edge of the blade isn’t to everyone’s taste and rather takes away from the product’s sleek image. But given its reasonable price tag for a knife of this quality this is not too much of an issue.
Santoku Forged 7” Chef’s Knife, £59.95 from www.pamperedchef.com

Knife Set

Save on the set! Our Knife Set has everything you need to start a collection of high-quality cutlery. These sharp, fully forged knives will make meal prep so much easier. Includes six knives, Kitchen Shears, Honing Tool, and a Knife Block.

Details

Cutlery

  • Includes six knives:
    • 8″ Chef’s Knife
    • 8″ Bread Knife
    • 5″ Santoku Knife
    • 5″ Utility Knife
    • 5″ Tomato Knife
    • 3″ Paring Knife
  • Each knife is finely crafted from a single piece of fully forged, high-carbon German steel for superior cutting performance.
  • Pakkawood handles provide a comfortable grip and extra durability.
  • Full tang for strength and perfect balance.
  • Tapered blades for precise cutting.
  • Specially designed bolsters evenly distribute weight and keep the knives balanced.
  • Storage covers keep hands safe and protect the knives.
  • Hand wash only.
  • Lifetime guarantee.

Kitchen Shears

  • Easily cuts through everything from chicken bone to fine cheese cloth.
  • German cast stainless steel.
  • Comes apart for easy cleaning.
  • Hand wash only.
  • Lifetime guarantee.

Honing Tool

  • Ceramic rods hone non-serrated knives.
  • Soft-grip, nonslip base keeps tool from sliding around during honing.
  • Slide-out guard protects surfaces, and can be aligned for both left- and right-handed users.
  • Use the tool to maintain alignment of the edge as often as needed, even daily.
  • Do not use on serrated knives.
  • Hand wash only.
  • Three-year guarantee.

Knife Block

  • 11½” x 5½” x 8″.
  • Acacia wood.
  • 20 horizontal slots hold 11 standard knives, 8 steak knives, and 1 pair of shears.
  • Wipe clean.
  • Three-year guarantee.

Learn more about our cutlery collection here.

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